Revolting Animation: The Hierarchy of Masculinities in the Representation of Race and Male Same-Sex Desire in Adult Cartoons

  • Irene Fubara-Manuel University of Sussex
Keywords: animation, race, sexuality, masculinities, black gay masculinities, hegemonic masculinity

Abstract

This article examines the representations of race and male same-sex desire portrayed by black gay male characters on the adult animated television show, The Boondocks (2005). Centralizing its analysis of The Boondocks as a canonical text of black gay representation within animation, this paper highlights the signs of the male matriarch, booty warrior, and homothug and their iterations in three other animated TV shows—The Cleveland Show (2009), American Dad! (2005), and Chozen (2014). This article posits that these signs connote the ideology of hegemonic masculinity and its racial ordering. Drawing on Halberstam’s (2011) ‘revolting animation’, Ngai’s (2005) ‘animatedness’, and Wells’ (1998) ‘hierarchies of masculinities’, this article addresses these contradicting signs of black gay masculinities within the aforementioned animated television shows, situating them within respective sexual and racial politics in the United States.

Author Biography

Irene Fubara-Manuel, University of Sussex

Irene Fubara-Manuel is a practice-based researcher and 3rd-year Doctoral student in Creative and Critical Practice at the University of Sussex. Her ongoing research incorporates animation in interrogating the biometric surveillance of black migrants. Her most recent projects include an installation (Border Ritual) and a video game (Border Ritual 2.0), which both present interventions of the process of crossing the UK Border as a black migrant.

Published
October 17, 2017
How to Cite
Fubara-Manuel, I. (2017, October 17). Revolting Animation: The Hierarchy of Masculinities in the Representation of Race and Male Same-Sex Desire in Adult Cartoons. Networking Knowledge: Journal of the MeCCSA Postgraduate Network, 10(3), 71-82. Retrieved from http://ojs.meccsa.org.uk/index.php/netknow/article/view/517